It’s What Comes Out That Counts

Some people, in search of relaxation, play tennis; others chess or mahjong maybe. Me, to relax, I play the guitar. Except that, at times, this blasted instrument is not quite the stress buster I want it to be. Case in point: I was working on–and struggling with–a beautiful piece of music called Marieta. It’s an hypnotic piece, not overly complex (when compared to other contemporary pieces) but nuanced–a sneaky sort of nuanced.

Music is a cross between golf and, oh I don’t know, acting maybe. Like golf, it’s all about technique. And like acting, it’s the interpretation and interpersonal style that makes or breaks the end result. And it was frankly in all of that that I was struggling. I was tilting at windmills, trying to balance technique (the accurate placement on the fingerboard), interpretation (loud when the piece called for it, and soft when it didn’t) and style (making the whole thing cohesive and compelling).

Over and over, I started and restarted the piece–bar after bar–getting at times impatient and at other times impatient and frustrated.

And then a thought hit me. Instead of focusing on how to pluck the strings and how to position my fingers, what if I tried it with the other side of the instrument in mind? What if, while playing, I actually listened to what was coming out of my guitar? What if I tried to experience the whole process as a listener rather than a technician?

And you know what? Strange as that might appear, it actually worked. Focusing on the outcome made me more attentive to what I wanted to achieve. And that felt good.

And then, a little later, another thought hit home. And it was this. How often, as entrepreneurs and advisors, do we focus only on the effort that we put into a project? How often do we lose sight on what our customers are “hearing”–on what they’re experiencing? I mean, let’s face it, all too often, we’re solely focused on the technical side of the work we perform. Too many of us are all too self-aware and self-obsessed with the required skill and acquired dexterity of the oh-so-important work that we do. Which begs the question. Do any of us ever stop, even for a minute, to imagine what the person sitting on the other side of our desk is getting from all this? How often do we pause to consider the client perspective–the customer perception? Sad to say, for too many of us, the answer is, not very often.

And so, as entrepreneurs, as advisors and business owners, we’re missing the boat. We’re focusing on inputs rather than outcomes. And we’re losing a key opportunity to make our service more client-centric. So hear’s (get it?) a suggestion; let’s tune our ears so that we can listen from our clients’ perspective. Let’s view our work the way they might view it. And maybe that way we’ll solidify, even further, the client relationship. And we’ll all  enjoy the overall sound of success.

Great News if You’re an Accountant

Journal Entries. We accountants, we love our journal entries, right? Love them so much there’s even an accountant’s credo. There’s nothing that can’t be fixed with a neat and tidy journal entry. Yeah, journal entries, they’re the WD40 of number crunching; the duct tape of data entry.

And yet, for accountants, there’s always been a bit of a problem–a perfect storm of frustration–that would come crashing down whenever three particular elements converged all at once. And those three elements were:

  • QuickBooks Online
  • Journal Entries
  • Sales Tax Accounts

You know what I’m talking about right? I have certainly written about it before. Even offered a nifty workaround.

But now (well, as of mere weeks ago actually) it’s all good. If you’re an accountant, and you want to record a journal entry in QuickBooks Online, and you want–in that journal entry–to debit or credit a sales tax account. Well, go ahead. Knock yourself out. It’ll all work out. You won’t mess anything up and everything will remain in sync and in balance. All thanks to a new feature that adds a Sales Tax column in the journal entry window, a column that  now allows you to pick a destination line number on the corresponding sales tax return.

Which means, with this new feature, the GL and the sales tax report will always be in sync. No more out-of-balance reports. No more head scratching. No more adjustments. Which also means that your clients will, once again, view you–the fearless accountant–as the rock star that you truly are.

Right?